Coin Up

Thanks to the endlessly resourceful NorCal Arcade Club, and associates, my Astro City and Egret now sport ashtrays full of tokens. Fingering the wire was fun and all, but crediting with a coin is a must for the most legit and pleasurable arcade experience in the home. You just try harder when it costs you coins (which are free to you, though which you initially had to pay for, though you have the key so you can use them again, but still, try harder).


Both coin mechs had to be adjusted a bit since they were setup to accept 100 yen coins, which I only had a handful of. The Egret’s mech needed the magnet removed, but on the AC I had to sand down a metal post to let the larger token pass smoothly.

For some reason I don’t mind freeplay on the American woodies — partly because their coin doors aren’t as easy to open. But on Japanese cabs it just feels cheap to wander up and smash your finger into the 1p button like a dud.

Candy Speaker Replacements

Occasionally I start researching speakers for the Astro City and Egret II, don’t find much, then give up for a few months and try again. The only drop-in solution I’d come across always seemed to be the Cambridge Soundworks SBS 52. Knowing this would work for the AC, I started focusing on what would fit in the Egret. There were a couple Egret tutorials for full on powered speaker solutions, usually involving modifying the original wiring and shoving in an ugly PC subwoofer behind the coin box. Yech. I didn’t want the cabs to sound unnaturally pumped, I simply wanted them to sound better. The stock speakers in both are actually pretty decent, but the Egret in particular could use a boost.

Cambridge SBS 52 are cheap on eBay so I thought I’d give them a shot in the AC. Removing the housings required a long Phillips screwdriver, with a fifth screw hidden behind the speaker grill. I removed the old solder, brought them upstairs and swapped them with the AC’s originals, using its quick disconnects. Sampling games I was familiar with I could hear maybe a very slight improvement, but the midtones had a kind of boxiness to them that wasn’t so pleasing. Or maybe they were fine and I just needed to give them more time.

I went ahead and took apart the Egret’s factory speakers which took a little more work to disassemble. They have their own brackets and speaker boxes, and their wires were soldered directly on to the driver’s tabs rather than using connectors. It turned out the Egret’s speakers are also 3″, same as the AC, and both are 4 Ohm ~10 watt. So sorta rushing things, I ordered another cheap pair of SBS 52. When they arrived I went through the same process, removing the housings, desoldering, then desoldering the Egret’s speakers, soldering in the new ones, back in their boxes with the bracket and back in the cab.

Since I’ve been playing a lot of DonPachi I threw the board in and played for a few minutes. It didn’t take long to realize it actually sounded a bit worse. I’m not sure how I thought swapping in unpowered PC speakers would be an improvement. I also realized that the Cambridge speakers were actually 3.5 Ohm — probably not a big deal but long term maybe not a great idea. In the end I put the factory speakers back in both cabs, annoyed with the whole project. Anyway, these were never meant to sit in someone’s office, but in cacophonous arcades pushed, by the dozens, side-to-side. This was another lesson in being happy with what you already have.

Astro City

This addition slipped in about four months ago from my Egret II source. After a few days with the Egret, despite the rotating monitor, I realized I wanted to find a way to fit in a second cab. It’s like salt without pepper, DoDonPachi without Progear. And beyond monitor orientation, playing one game while attract flickers on the other is joy. But considering the costs and space, and idiocy, I tried to push it out of my mind, but every time I rotated the Egret the thought came back.

At some point I measured again to be certain two cabs wouldn’t fit in my office. I’d wanted to move the Egret into the corner anyway, which seemed like the ideal spot for two cabs. Somehow I’d originally miscalculated the dimensions and found there was indeed 70″ free after rearranging some bookshelves. An Astro City was available, looked good, and once delivery was offered it was all over.

When my friend flipped the switch the Nano MS8 lit up in the middle of the day with bright, punchy colors and sharp pixels, making me a little sad when I looked over at the Egret’s softer, more worn MS9. Side-by-side they were truly a handsome duo. I spent a few hours cleaning it up with magic erasers and vacuuming out the prerequisite cobwebs. Luckily like the Egret it needed almost no work other than a bulb and some replacement Sanwa sticks and buttons, and an extra Sega 5380 key.

Only three of my 14 PCBs are yoko, though if you count all the Neo Geo games I guess that makes it about even. Gokujou Parodius alone makes it worthwhile, but it’s really the Neo Geo that lives in the Astro the most.