Archives for September 2016

Truxton Cabaret Part 2

Posted September 21, 2016

This has been an interesting project. Unlike previous restores which became what they already were, this is a shrunken-down conversion in need of reviving, with a few alterations. I’ve also taken my time a bit more, because there’s nothing more dull than a workshop with no work. I mostly go down on the weekends, turn on KALX, play a few credits of Robotron, then settle into a couple tasks.

As was established in the first post, the control panel began as Centipede, and then somewhere along the way an operator drilled new button holes and crudely patched the gap where the trackball had been. Before stripping it, I’d made a quick mockup of a one player panel with three buttons, which I thought better suited its new life as a jamma cabaret. More on that later.

With the cabinet and metal parts painted, I reassembled the coin doors and installed new locks. The Truxton marquee fit nicely into place, secured by six allen bolts, which look like security torx if you blur your eyes. Actually I liked them well enough to affix the speaker grill, replacing the kind-of-ugly original rivets.

Next I turned to the bare interior and added a new switching power supply, and then it occurred to me there was no AC line filter or fuse block. After a couple unsuccessful stops around town (actually Radio Shack did have a fuse block, but not much else, the poor neutered bastard), I emailed Bob Roberts who had the missing parts in my hands three days later. Using Bob’s article on AC wiring as a guide, I cut a 12″x12″ board and mounted the monitor’s isolation transformer, AC filter, fuse and distribution blocks, and new power cord.
The simple diagram really tells you everything you need to know. Using 18g wire, I ran an earth ground line across a few components and up to the monitor frame, which will extend to the metal control panel. It powered up and voltages tested accurately.

As a side note about what not to do, for maybe the third project now I accidentally turned the power on with the monitor anode cap off. Unlike the beautiful arc I saw last time, this was fairly uneventful but dumb. Just never leave the cap off. After cleaning or repairs, stick the thing back on and be done with it!

While some cabarets had a backlit marquee, Centipede apparently did not. I had a cheap florescent light fixture on hand and a couple brackets that placed it directly across from the rear of the marquee. I pulled AC directly from the power supply and tucked away the wiring. What I thought was going to be challenging was a rather straight forward fix.

Back to the control panel — originally I considered having the holes welded shut, but the prohibitive quote made me turn back to my old JB Weld ways. Initially I grabbed some washers, but I ended up using thin sheets of aluminum cut with tin snips. This provided the backing, and JB Weld filled the surfaces. After 24 hours you could press your finger into the mend with no resistance, and in two days it felt nearly as hard as the metal. After some sanding and more leveling out, it should be in good shape for the overlay to come.