Archives for August 2016

Truxton Cabaret Part 1

Posted August 23, 2016

Cabaret and mini cabinets are cute-as-a-button shrunken arcade cabinets that Atari and other game manufacturers created in the early 1980s. Shorter, lighter, and noticeably narrower than the standard cabinet, the cabaret was less menacing with its stoic wood-grained vinyl sides, likely designed for being tucked away into restaurants, corner stores and dens. Atari turned some of their classics like Dig Dug, Tempest, and Centipede into iconic cabarets with 19″ monitor squeezed in. Their size makes them ideal to collect if space is a concern. I’ve wanted to find a Robotron cabaret but they’re fairly uncommon and I restored a full-sized version earlier this year. While there are several others I’d like to own, I’ve been more interested in finding a scrappy cabaret for general jamma use. It turned out that our Mike, once again, found an ideal candidate. A Truxton conversion in what was originally a Centipede cabaret.

The cabinet is in pretty good shape, probably more so than the first three restores I’ve done. The original wood-grained vinyl sides are intact with just a few small gouges. A few rips in the black textured vinyl on top means the rest will have to be peeled off and painted over — not really seen anyway. Someone had installed a huge metal lock bar across the coin doors which should be easy enough to remove and bondo over the holes. The original Truxton cardboard bezel is a bit faded but otherwise fine. Initially I wondered if Romstar, the US publisher of Toaplan’s Tatsujin, created both full size and mini conversion kits. This would be a surprising effort considering how unlikely Truxton’s popularity would’ve been in the US at the time. If there was a mini conversion kit, the control panel overlay didn’t make it on this cabinet. And the marquee was trimmed down from a more common size. The inside is pretty economical since it had been converted to jamma and ran off a switching power supply. The K7000 monitor seems in decent shape and without too much burn. To recoup half the cost of the purchase, I sold the Truxton PCB, as I already had a Tatsujin in my collection.

It was a tad tempting to just slide it in next to Galaga and Robotron, but what would be the fun in that. There’s a lot of potential here I didn’t want to waste. As I stripped it down I considered converting it back into Centipede, but a Truxton cabaret seems more unusual, and better suited to the shooters I’ll play in it. While vacuuming out the bottom, I saw signs of another past life, a Sky Shark sticker, confirmed later when stripping the control panel. Centipede > Sky Shark > Truxton. I put the cab on its back and made a slight alteration to the already modified marquee cutout to allow for more light to pass through. The speaker grill needed flattening so I had to drill out the rivets to get it off. Next I stripped the paint off the metal parts and control panel, the latter taking my usual 2-3 hours — the next time I may swap Citristrip for a more lethal paint stripper. Finally I gave the front of the cab and metal parts a few coats of primer, then my standard Rustoleum Satin Black for the wood and Flat Black for the metal, with a little textured paint first for the coin doors. Painting kinda sucks, but I’m always amazed at the difference it makes.

A smallish list of basic parts remained: leg levelers, power supply, 6×9 speaker, t-molding, service panel button and a joystick and buttons, and a couple coin door locks. Someone really should sell an arcade restoration kit for the essentials. A larger task needed sorted though — I decided to give the cabaret a different control arrangement by moving the joystick off-center and creating a three-button layout. This was going to require filling in a variety of now unneeded holes, including the whopper that held the original Centipede trackball, then drilling two new button holes, and lastly making a new overlay from a scan of the bezel art. Certainly the most customization I’ve done so far, but nothing too crazy.