Archives for July 2016

Robotron Restore Part 3

Posted July 26, 2016

With most of the hard work on Robotron finished, what remained was largely painting, a few small details, and reassembly. I started by sanding the front, top, and back of the cabinet. A bit of bondo repaired the bottom/front which was a crumbling mess. Once smoothed out I hit it with three coats of Rustoleum Satin Black, but the next day it almost looked better off before I touched it. It must have also dried too quickly in the cold basement, as little spots had formed. A few days later I took Mike’s advice and laid down three coats of black primer which began to give it a cohesive finish, and then several layers of Satin Black. Once the cabinet was vertical and away from the harsh work light it looked rather nice.

Painting continued with the coin doors, brackets, and a few bolts. For these I used a matte black, with a couple coats of textured paint first to give it a bit of its original surface. The temptation persists to have these parts sandblasted, and to buy paint guns and setup a little booth, but to maintain my sanity I’m trying to avoid looking for perfection in these projects.

The original speaker was, well, 30 year old paper, so I replaced it with a 4 ohm Jensen Mod 6-15. The speaker grill, which sits above the screen and runs the width of the game, was missing on mine. A KLOV member was selling beautifully machined reproductions which fit snuggly in place. I ended up swapping the original glass bezel, which had considerable scratches and gouges across the paint and screen, with another unexpectedly polished reproduction. Generally I try to stick to original parts, but when they’re not really available, it’s excellent that people are out there making this stuff. As a last tweak and suggestion from Mike, I replaced the incandescent bulbs under the player one and two buttons with blue LEDs which significantly helped the brightness.

Carefully I wired the PCBs together, plugged it in, and nervously waited for the startup sequence. Shazam! No pops, smoke or errors. I never would’ve guessed I’d own a Robotron, especially one in such decent shape. And now here it is, Vid Kidz’s code still glowing since 1982.

Coin Up

Posted July 12, 2016

Thanks to the endlessly resourceful NorCal Arcade Club, and associates, my Astro City and Egret now sport ashtrays full of tokens. Fingering the wire was fun and all, but crediting with a coin is a must for the most legit and pleasurable arcade experience in the home. You just try harder when it costs you coins (which are free to you, though which you initially had to pay for, though you have the key so you can use them again, but still, try harder).

Both coin mechs had to be adjusted a bit since they were setup to accept 100 yen coins, which I only had a handful of. The Egret’s mech needed the magnet removed, but on the AC I had to sand down a metal post to let the larger token pass smoothly.

For some reason I don’t mind freeplay on the American woodies — partly because their coin doors aren’t as easy to open. But on Japanese cabs it just feels cheap to wander up and smash your finger into the 1p button like a dud.