DonPachi

Posted February 7, 2016

I’m going to start cataloging PCB pickups here because, well, I enjoy the look of the hardware, and it suits this site’s journaling characteristics. While this wasn’t my first Cave board, it’s my first of the series, and Cave’s first arcade release. DonPachi isn’t terribly hard to find — certainly not as rare as its sequel, the pricier DoDonPachi — and I do like origin stories.

Published by Atlus in 1995 and based on Cave’s first generation 68000 hardware, DonPachi hits that mid-90s sweet spot for me in terms of hand drawn sprites, semi-complex animations, cinematic music and well balanced gameplay and ramp-up in difficulty. In the more frantic moments it seems to struggle to overlap audio, and the slowdown of the action, which is not too common here, is a welcome second or two of relief.

Initially I opted to use ship Type-A, which is the fastest, and seemed well suited in setting the pace. Chaining, the key element of killing enemies and scenery in quick succession for huge bonus points, felt well controlled by this ship type. But I also found myself constantly dying in area two and three and realized this ship may be better left for now to the experienced players. I became curious about Type-C after watching other runs but had a hard time adapting to the much slower speed. It played like a different game. Soon I was progressing further and scoring higher and haven’t turned back.

The weapons are limited, essentially focused on upgrading its power, and alternate between fire and laser by holding down the shot button at the expense of a slower ship, which became a classic shmup tradeoff. Bombing, the last resort oh fuck savior, modifies rank, along with losing a life. Keeping rank from making things too difficult is tempting, but bomb your way through a complex scene and you’ll never learn it. The controls are simple and effective and yet offer plenty of opportunities for your own play style.

Besides the addiction of returning to a game that constantly threatens to kill you, the draw of chaining, collecting each area’s hidden bee items, and pure score, ramps up DonPachi‘s replay value significantly. After a couple months I’m finally reaching near the end of area four (out of five) — even with all the progress it’s hard to imagine clearing the first loop on a credit, let alone the second. I give it a few attempts most days, and it offers an awful lot of fun in return.

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