Robotron Restore Part 1

Posted February 5, 2016

Having been content with JROK’s multi Williams, and considering the rarity of Robotron cabinets, I never really thought I’d have to decide whether or not to buy one. Of course I should’ve seen that I’m weak and can rarely say no to obsessions. A few months back Mike stumbled across an early model with the wrap-around control panel. While the sides were rather ragged, most everything was original except for the sticks and speaker grill. He focussed on the board stack to address the common Williams’s failings, replacing the RAM, connectors and pins, rebuilding the power supply, and fitted in a 2032 lithium, replacing the AA batteries.

Once Mike got it working and stable, I assumed, being a big fan of the game, he would then restore it for his collection. But a few weeks later he suddenly found a second Robotron in Los Angeles. Though this one lacked the original side art and PCBs, he decided to throw a JROK inside, keep it and sell the first one. How could I say no?

In person the cabinet was pretty rough, with the sides showing enough wear to warrant repainting, which is no easy feat. I’d read enough restore posts to know this involved careful color matching, several coats of silver, and an expensive set of stencils with rounds of red and blue paint. And ideally an air gun setup. While tempting, the effort and cost involved, when it would likely have one or both sides covered by other games anyway, wasn’t exciting me to go buy supplies. Also, like with Gyruss and Galaga, having some of the cab left untouched — with its period scars — is far preferable to me than ending up with something that looks like a shiny, new box.

Since I decided to leave the sides intact and original, I wanted to address everything else to the best of my abilities. This is one of the fun parts, the slow observation, what’s broken and what can be refurbished, and then drawing up a plan. I Wondered what lives it had led and in what arcades — I found a Chucky Cheese token and a slick sticker of a boy in purple slacks. A quick rundown.

  • The marquee had wear but was very useable, while the glass bezel could stand to be replaced.
  • The control panel needed major work all around, from overlay to new sticks.
  • While the coin door was solid, the bottom coin door had about a dozen more holes than it needed.
  • Like many cabs it had been dragged around in its later years without leg levelers, and the bottom showed it.
  • The wiring harness was good throughout.
  • The back doors were ok, but could certainly use primer and paint, along with the front and top of the cab.
  • One area where you could find yourself lost for days would obviously be the monitor and the PCBs, but this time I was lucky. The K4900 worked well, rather bright and colorful, though with traditional Robotron burn.

A sizable list of tasks but nothing too difficult. Holy mackerel it’s Robotron!

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