Galaga Restore Part 3

Posted January 24, 2016

A few items had remained to finish this project, largely the K7000 chassis. I was losing steam after spending weeks sorting out endless monitor problems. Before I could dive back in with another round of prodding, I suddenly found a box in front of our door containing a Sharp Image monitor chassis. Mike! This guy’s too nice — I’m not even sure where he found this thing. Except for a fairly menacing looking very alive spider, the chassis looked to be in excellent shape. I swapped it in and it immediately worked. Using the test pattern generator I calibrated it with a mirror then mounted it back in the cab. While I value the gained experience of working on an old monitor, in the end simply replacing it turned out to be the sanest option.

There were a couple more issues to work out. One was quick, replacing the 35-year-old 6×9 speaker. It actually sounded fine, but if I could eke out a small improvement, why not. Surprisingly I could find very few 6×9 speakers between $10 and $75, so I chose a Lanzar OPTI2698 — 8 Ohm and capable of 1190 more watts than necessary.

Now for the joystick. Even after previously spending several numerous hours rebuilding the original, it continued to feel sloppy. Worse, the two leaf switches would occasionally need bent again to help the stick auto center, inevitably causing the ship to move on its own in one direction (more on that in a minute) when the strength of both leafs weren’t exactly the same. Rather than try finding another Galaga stick, I started to consider Mike’s suggestion of using a Pac-Pro joystick. While I usually loathe the idea of swapping in modern replacements, the originals just didn’t wear well, and this was still a leaf stick. It mounted on the control panel with a Twisted Quarter Galaga adapter plate, with the oval hole in both acting as a 2-way guide. Unfortunately once the control panel was back on the cabinet, I found that it wouldn’t shut completely — the Pac-Pro base and the top leaf tabs were protruding about 1/8th of an inch too far. The tabs were able to bend 90 degrees, but I had to take the Dremel to one side of the new base. Nothing that’s ever seen, and it fit. I wish the red balltop was the same size and material as the original, but its matte finish matches the overlay well. It’s considerably stiffer but hopefully that will become less noticeable as it breaks in.

Overlapping with the previous issue of the old leaf switches sometimes nudging the ship by themselves, at some point this started to happen even when the joystick wasn’t plugged in. After crediting up, the ship would slowly gravitate to the left in random blips. It turned out to be one of the Namco custom chips, 51xx. I swapped it out with another 51xx on a spare Galaga PCB I happened to have. Previously I’d hoped to fix this second board and sell it, but having a donor board on hand seems a much better idea.

It’s great having the game finished, slid in next to Gyruss, and actually playable. I owe a big thanks to Mike for not only locating and delivering Galaga, but also tirelessly answering my tiresome questions, and problem solving from beginning to end. He elevates “a friend in the hobby” into something we should all hope to emulate.

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