Galaga Restore Part 2

Posted January 2, 2016

It’s been a few months since Galaga was mostly wrapped up, with one remaining snag that’s lingering on into the new year. What could it be? How exiting, but first let’s see where we left off.

I applied several coats of paint to the front and back of the cabinet, the coin door, other metal parts and screws. For a rattlecan, as it’s affectionately called, Rustoleum Satin Black actually does a decent job on smooth surfaces. At some point I suppose I really should look into an air gun. There was a stubborn bondo hump on both the coin door and the front of the cab from patched holes which took three or four rounds of sanding and painting but eventually blended in. After a few days of drying, I applied the kick plate and front art, bolted the coin door back on and added new coin door inserts and bulbs. The original Midway coin door plate, despite my best efforts to save it and the rivets, had to be replaced by a repro. Next came the control panel overlay and rebuilding the original joystick, which included replacing the bushings and tweaks to the leaf switches to try and get the stick to center with less slack.

At one point I had intended on adding a Galaga ’88 board to the mix, requiring a double jamma adapter, a Galaga-to-JAMMA adapter, and of course Galaga ’88. Eventually I found the PCB, but it wasn’t cheap and looked so good in the Egret that I decided to skip the dual setup and leave Galaga as original.

The last issue to work out was the finicky K4600 monitor. It had a magenta cast to it, was faded to almost black at the top and overly bright at the bottom, and had occasional flickers of light. I started by replacing the caps and reflowing solder on the chassis — no change. Hoping that it may just need the pots fine tuned, I spent hours calibrating it but the issues remained. Still, it was good experience for someone with no real monitor knowledge, including watching my first horizontal width coil disintegrate.

As I started looking on KLOV for local replacements, Mike offered up a K7000 project monitor. Since the closest alternative was in Sacramento, I agreed to Mike’s generous donation and began researching known issues and buying a few parts: flyback, HOT, voltage regulator, C36 safety cap, and R103. Little by little I replaced the parts that had failed, but I still couldn’t get the thing to power up until Mike pointed out that the middle leg on the HOT wasn’t connected. Fool!

While the K7000 was now firing up, the image was rather magenta again, strangely similar to the K4600 — while I could see red, blue and green individually, it somehow wasn’t mixing for pure whites. To rule out the PCB I tried Gaplus which gave exactly the same results. Then came a series of never ending tweaks and tests, checking B+ (123.6), to more reflowing and calibrations. Mike brought over a test pattern generator which helped since Galaga only displays a test grid. We adjusted convergence, then tried swapping Q201, Q202, and Q203 transistors around on the neckboard. Nothing seemed to help, then at some point we lost blue entirely. Since then some good suggestions have come through KLOV, requiring more time on this before I start hunting for another K7000 chassis.

So Galaga — it’s close! The cab was looking good, though like Gyruss I kept the sides original so it certainly looks better slid in next to other games. Thanks to the enhancement pack it’s now saving high scores like Gyruss. Hopefully with a bit more work on the monitor this project will be completed.

Speak Your Mind

*