Galaga Restore Part 1

Once the Gyruss restore was finished (still looking for a top marquee bracket and a Centuri coin door), I slid it against the wall into its home, always intending for it to live in the workshop where it can be played while fiddling with other projects, and is conveniently located for repairs if (when) it breaks one day. The high score save kit really adds an incentive every time I’m down there, and with some LED lights and music, the space is much cozier than it was in January. Of course the more games added the less space there will be for restores (and storage). Some better shelving would likely make room for several more games. There are probably more important projects to occupy my time, like replacing windows, laying a new bathroom floor, and gutting the kitchen, but those things are difficult and costly, and don’t become an arcade game at the end. Guilt aside, I really enjoyed and now miss the stuff that went into the game restore.

It would be nice to take your pick of the games you’d like to restore and play, but the reality most of the time is choosing from what’s available in your area. Texting with my friend Mike that I was feeling fidgety without a project, I offhandedly mentioned wanting a Galaga. The next day he sent me photos of one in the back of his truck that, by chance, he’d gotten a lead on (this guy!). I could hardly say no. Pulled from a hair salon in Fruitvale, it still had the sweet, stale smell of hair products. The game played but with occasional bursts of piercing distortions accompanying the explosions. The K4600 monitor was faint and rather purple, definitely needing cleaned and capped. Also original, for better and worse, was pretty much everything else: cabinet, marquee, glass bezel, joystick, Midway coin door, PCB, and the Midway power supply (though someone had already wired it to use a switching power supply). Most of the pieces were there, though it needed plenty of love, to be expected from something built in 1981 and coined up, according to the coin counter, 143,000 times.

After a laundry list of general supplies like wire wheels for the drill, Citrustrip, and paint, acquiring a shop-vac and an air compressor were the main purchases this time. Then game supplies: new buttons, control panel overlay, monitor cap kit, t-molding, leg levelers, new power supply, coin door bulbs, kick plate and front art. I’m not going to touch the side art — like Gyruss, it has its scratches and gouges but I prefer those scars to the cabinet looking like a brand new box. This is 90% true. As the sides were originally laminate, I’m not sure I want to deal with replacing it, nor do I have a router.

For a couple weeks I just circled the game, making and rearranging a to do list, taking reference pictures of wires and connectors and bolts, then slowly stripping it down and bagging the parts. Placing the cabinet on its side I started the deep clean, vacuuming up wads of hair and dust, and Simple Greening away many layers of funky grime. Now that the cabinet was bare and clean it needed repaired on the bottom corner of the wood that had come apart. Since this wasn’t one of the Ms. Pac-Man plywood cabinets, the MDF was crumbly where some of the white pegs would normally keep the boards joined. After some research and talking to Mike I decided to epoxy the joints, then 24 hours later install six brackets along the inside/bottom edges. Happy with the rigidity of the cabinet, I moved on to stripping the old paint off the coin door and marquee brackets, then scraped off the CPO with a heat gun and a couple rounds of Citrustrip. I’m not sure that stripping down the parts to bare metal was entirely necessary, but I wanted to see how it compared to some of Gyruss’s flaws.

Before painting the coin door and front of the cabinet those pesky security bar holes needed to be filled. JB Weld worked fine on the metal parts (though the holes were probably small enough for Bondo), and a wooden dowel and wood glue plugged the holes in the cabinet. A day or so later I sanded down the excess, then started prepping everything for paint. My list was shrinking and I was beginning to imagine the game happily working and humming its melodies.

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