Gyruss Restore Part 3

Posted July 18, 2015

Finally a Gyruss PCB popped up on eBay which I watched for several days, assuming the price would be driven past what I’d be willing to pay. In the end I got it for $57, quite a lucky break for an original Konami board in such great shape. I stood the cabinet back up and was happy and almost surprised to see the game actually working for the first time. I risked that luck by installing the high score save kit. I desoldered the existing RAM chip but the thing wouldn’t budge. A little solder wick loosened it the rest of the way. Next I soldered on the socket and pressed the new NVRAM into place. But when I powered up the board I saw a strange pattern on the screen. Eventually I realized I’d scratched a trace, and should’ve just cut the legs on the RAM rather than try to save it (as Matt points out). At least I gained a little trace repair experience.

Now it was time to apply the repro control panel overlay. I nervously taped it in place then started peeling off the backing and smoothing it down. All good, though I did notice a slight gap between the metal and the overlay in the back bend. Using the schematic I wired up the new buttons and Monroe stick, wiring it wrong twice before looking closer at the leaf switch placements. The leafs also required some straightening out to smooth the transition from one direction to another.

After talking with Mike, the hobby store dude I bought the cabinet from, I decided to change directions with the paint and try Rustoleum Canyon Satin Black, a spray paint rather than rolling it on. I’d seen his Gyruss restore in person, and photos of his Popeye which had a similar smooth black front, both of which turned out quite well. Two coats within an hour, then repeat 48 hours later. I went ahead and painted the top and back and various parts: marquee bracket, control panel hinge, vents, bolts and screws. For the coin door I used Rustoleum hammered spray paint, then a couple coats of Rustoleum semi gloss black spray paint. I needed to partially sand and repaint the coin door a few times to try and remove some bubbles that kept forming. It probably would’ve worked the first time if I had removed all of the original paint, but I wasn’t overly concerned since one day I’d like to replace it with a Centuri coin door.

While it was on its back I ran new t-molding down the grooves, using liquid nails glue on the bottom to hold it in place. Now that everything was dry I fastened the control panel on the cabinet, reassembled the coin door, then put in the blackout cardboard, original bezel art and smoked plexi. Slowly I realized that these were the last steps and it was more or less finished, after many months of slow progress and a variety of mistakes. After plugging it in I turned off the lights and put a new high score on the board, which beautifully remained once powered off and on.

I’m still looking for a top marquee bracket and replacement speakers, as both the originals have a rip in the cones, though they sound fine. A tube with less burn would be nice, but with the dark plexi in place it’s not too noticeable. The sideart is fairly worn but preferable to a modern replacement, plus I really like the graffiti.

Well, it’s been fun. I’m already missing having a project in the workshop to spend time wtih. Thanks to John’s Arcade videos and forum which have been incredibly helpful, Mike the hobby store dude who’s provided lots of advice along the way, and KLOV.

Comments

  1. That looks amazing. Great work!

  2. Thanks Aaron!

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