Gyruss Restore Part 2

Posted July 6, 2015

Back in January when I picked up a Gyruss to try and restore, our basement space I’d hoped to use as a workshop had no electricity other than a dim ceiling lightbulb and was full of discarded paint cans, unused bookshelves, a 100lb bathroom sink and a few spiders. The old, handmade workbench along the back wall held dusty blinds, a rusty mattress frame, and wooden shutters from some depressing far away time.

A few months ago I ordered two LED ceiling lights and brought back the electricians, who rewired several of our knob-and-tube outlets, to install the lighting and add an outlet to each side of the workbench. This motivated me to spend a few nights cleaning and a trip to the dump. Then I slowly started buying the tools I’d never really owned before: Molex crimpers, actually good wire strippers, a soldering iron, a hand sander, and a Fluke multimeter. That was a start.

The Gyruss itself had its own list: a better marquee, a Monroe joystick, a control panel overlay, t-molding, a new power supply, and of course to either fix the original PCB or find a replacement. When powered up both the audio and video were scrambled, and after checking voltages and looking for basic, obvious problems, a few forum posts confirmed it was likely beyond my abilities for the time being.

While waiting on a replacement PCB I cleaned the cabinet, added coin return lamps, Centuri 25 cent decals, a new lock, then tidied up the marquee light fixture wiring and did a tube swap for a less burned Wells Gardner K4900. A few hours alone went into restoring the Monroe stick to its original 360° glory. One night a moment of clarity made me slow down when I plugged in the cab and, having forgotten to put the monitor anode cap back on, created a lovely blue arc between it and the monitor frame.

Somewhere around this time I found another Gyruss PCB. Anxious to install Matt Osborn’s high score save kit, I practiced desoldering and soldering a 40-pin chip on another board, but when it came time to attempt the real thing I realized the Gyruss I had was a bootleg. I returned it and soon found a third board. This one wasn’t cheap, plus shipping from Canada, but it looked nearly new for being 32 years old. Sadly this one turned out to be a dud, so back it went.

Next I began working on the control panel, first using a heat gun to strip off the old artwork, then applying that beautiful pink citrus solvent to remove the remaining adhesive goop. After many messy rounds I sanded it down to its former factory glory, then primed and painted it black with Rustoleum enamel spray paint to prepare it for the overlay.

It was time to tip the game on its back and start sanding the front, as well as fill that extra security lock hole many cabinets end up with near the coin door. A little wood dowel and glue filled it in, then bondo smoothed it and a couple other spots. Now came what I thought would be one of the easier steps, painting the front of the cabinet. My first attempt was to use Rustoleum oil paint with a brush and roller, but this dried exactly as it looked, with lots of orange peeling and little bristle swirls. I tried again with just the brush, and again it dried with all the original brushstrokes.

I was starting to become frustrated with my progress, considering the game itself didn’t work and how hard it had become to find another board, that the front of the cabinet looked like a hand-painted shed, and knowing I still had to sand and paint a pile of metal parts. My lack of experience and limitations were bumming me out. Stay tuned for the exciting conclusion.

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