Robotron Restore Part 2

Now that I had a working Robotron, it was time to take it all apart and risk breaking it along the way. As with my first two restores, I took lots of reference photos, especially of the wiring on the 5-board set. Mike had done a nice job getting the game stable and I really didn’t want to mess that up. All the little parts, screws and bolts got bagged and labelled, stripping the cabinet down entirely except for the monitor. It’s actually a fairly light game, so even with the K4900 still in place it was easy to maneuver.

The first issue needing addressed was the bottom. I put my new jig saw to work cutting wood blocks and then drilling bolts into metal plates that held the legs. What could have been simple ended up taking me several hours, having very little experience with stuff like this. When all four were in place I stood the cabinet back up, already excited to see it looking proud.

The control panel on Robotron is wood, so I thought the work would go quicker, but it ended up taking even more time than stripping the overlay off a metal panel. Big chunks peeled off by hand, but the majority still required a lot of heat gun action and several coats of CitriStrip to get absolutely all of it. As always, a huge mess. I kept calling it done, sitting it aside, and then realizing it was still too gooey, another round of CitriStrip, and finally sanding. After several days of drying, I put the freshly painted metal joystick plates back in over the dust washers. Actually before that I used the plate’s holes as a guide to cut out holes in the repro overlay. All went well until I threw staples into the plastic guard at the top at a bad angle, causing the overlay to bubble up in a couple places. Some new old stock brackets, leafs and joysticks came together, new buttons, and then wiring it all back up, with fresh ground run to everything.

With one component entirely finished, I figured it was time to vacuum and deep clean the insides of the cab. Unlike that spooktastic Galaga, really only the bottom required attention — I yanked the wood plank out that holds the AC input, fuse block and transformer, thoroughly cleaned and soldered in a new grounded cord, and screwed it all back down.

Next I focussed on the top and bottom coin doors — the top only needed a little bending back in shape, but the bottom had about 13 holes likely from a security bracket that needed filling with JB Weld. Use too little and it caves in, too much and you’re sanding it back down for 15 minutes. This went on and on until it seemed the surface could eventually be painted. Lots of other metal parts got hit with Rustoleum Black, with most of the bolts first requiring some sanding in the hand drill.

So much left to do, and I couldn’t wait to get it back together to play it!

Tractor Beam

Well, Galaga has left the premises, and is the first cab I’ve sold. The joy was in having the game initially delivered, watching it freak out when I tried playing it, tearing it down, cleaning and fixing it, building it back up, and hearing those iconic sounds during those first few credits. In the end there just wasn’t enough game there, at least for my skill level and patience, and the thought of making a profit and freeing up the space won out.

Originally this was going to be a dual game setup, with Galaga ’88 secretly a button combo away. But once I saw ’88 on the Egret, I realized it would’ve been a sad fate for such a bright and colorful game.

DonPachi

I’m going to start cataloging PCB pickups here because, well, I enjoy the look of the hardware, and it suits this site’s journaling characteristics. While this wasn’t my first Cave board, it’s my first of the series, and Cave’s first arcade release. DonPachi isn’t terribly hard to find — certainly not as rare as its sequel, the pricier DoDonPachi — and I do like origin stories.

Published by Atlus in 1995 and based on Cave’s first generation 68000 hardware, DonPachi hits that mid-90s sweet spot for me in terms of hand drawn sprites, semi-complex animations, cinematic music and well balanced gameplay and ramp-up in difficulty. In the more frantic moments it seems to struggle to overlap audio, and the slowdown of the action, which is not too common here, is a welcome second or two of relief.

Initially I opted to use ship Type-A, which is the fastest, and seemed well suited in setting the pace. Chaining, the key element of killing enemies and scenery in quick succession for huge bonus points, felt well controlled by this ship type. But I also found myself constantly dying in area two and three and realized this ship may be better left for now to the experienced players. I became curious about Type-C after watching other runs but had a hard time adapting to the much slower speed. It played like a different game. Soon I was progressing further and scoring higher and haven’t turned back.

The weapons are limited, essentially focused on upgrading its power, and alternate between fire and laser by holding down the shot button at the expense of a slower ship, which became a classic shmup tradeoff. Bombing, the last resort oh fuck savior, modifies rank, along with losing a life. Keeping rank from making things too difficult is tempting, but bomb your way through a complex scene and you’ll never learn it. The controls are simple and effective and yet offer plenty of opportunities for your own play style.

Besides the addiction of returning to a game that constantly threatens to kill you, the draw of chaining, collecting each area’s hidden bee items, and pure score, ramps up DonPachi‘s replay value significantly. After a couple months I’m finally reaching near the end of area four (out of five) — even with all the progress it’s hard to imagine clearing the first loop on a credit, let alone the second. I give it a few attempts most days, and it offers an awful lot of fun in return.

Robotron Restore Part 1

Having been content with JROK’s multi Williams, and considering the rarity of Robotron cabinets, I never really thought I’d have to decide whether or not to buy one. Of course I should’ve seen that I’m weak and can rarely say no to obsessions. A few months back Mike stumbled across an early model with the wrap-around control panel. While the sides were rather ragged, most everything was original except for the sticks and speaker grill. He focussed on the board stack to address the common Williams’s failings, replacing the RAM, connectors and pins, rebuilding the power supply, and fitted in a 2032 lithium, replacing the AA batteries.

Once Mike got it working and stable, I assumed, being a big fan of the game, he would then restore it for his collection. But a few weeks later he suddenly found a second Robotron in Los Angeles. Though this one lacked the original side art and PCBs, he decided to throw a JROK inside, keep it and sell the first one. How could I say no?

In person the cabinet was pretty rough, with the sides showing enough wear to warrant repainting, which is no easy feat. I’d read enough restore posts to know this involved careful color matching, several coats of silver, and an expensive set of stencils with rounds of red and blue paint. And ideally an air gun setup. While tempting, the effort and cost involved, when it would likely have one or both sides covered by other games anyway, wasn’t exciting me to go buy supplies. Also, like with Gyruss and Galaga, having some of the cab left untouched — with its period scars — is far preferable to me than ending up with something that looks like a shiny, new box.

Since I decided to leave the sides intact and original, I wanted to address everything else to the best of my abilities. This is one of the fun parts, the slow observation, what’s broken and what can be refurbished, and then drawing up a plan. I Wondered what lives it had led and in what arcades — I found a Chucky Cheese token and a slick sticker of a boy in purple slacks. A quick rundown.

  • The marquee had wear but was very useable, while the glass bezel could stand to be replaced.
  • The control panel needed major work all around, from overlay to new sticks.
  • While the coin door was solid, the bottom coin door had about a dozen more holes than it needed.
  • Like many cabs it had been dragged around in its later years without leg levelers, and the bottom showed it.
  • The wiring harness was good throughout.
  • The back doors were ok, but could certainly use primer and paint, along with the front and top of the cab.
  • One area where you could find yourself lost for days would obviously be the monitor and the PCBs, but this time I was lucky. The K4900 worked well, rather bright and colorful, though with traditional Robotron burn.

A sizable list of tasks but nothing too difficult. Holy mackerel it’s Robotron!

Candy Speaker Replacements

Occasionally I start researching speakers for the Astro City and Egret II, don’t find much, then give up for a few months and try again. The only drop-in solution I’d come across always seemed to be the Cambridge Soundworks SBS 52. Knowing this would work for the AC, I started focusing on what would fit in the Egret. There were a couple Egret tutorials for full on powered speaker solutions, usually involving modifying the original wiring and shoving in an ugly PC subwoofer behind the coin box. Yech. I didn’t want the cabs to sound unnaturally pumped, I simply wanted them to sound better. The stock speakers in both are actually pretty decent, but the Egret in particular could use a boost.

Cambridge SBS 52 are cheap on eBay so I thought I’d give them a shot in the AC. Removing the housings required a long Phillips screwdriver, with a fifth screw hidden behind the speaker grill. I removed the old solder, brought them upstairs and swapped them with the AC’s originals, using its quick disconnects. Sampling games I was familiar with I could hear maybe a very slight improvement, but the midtones had a kind of boxiness to them that wasn’t so pleasing. Or maybe they were fine and I just needed to give them more time.

I went ahead and took apart the Egret’s factory speakers which took a little more work to disassemble. They have their own brackets and speaker boxes, and their wires were soldered directly on to the driver’s tabs rather than using connectors. It turned out the Egret’s speakers are also 3″, same as the AC, and both are 4 Ohm ~10 watt. So sorta rushing things, I ordered another cheap pair of SBS 52. When they arrived I went through the same process, removing the housings, desoldering, then desoldering the Egret’s speakers, soldering in the new ones, back in their boxes with the bracket and back in the cab.

Since I’ve been playing a lot of DonPachi I threw the board in and played for a few minutes. It didn’t take long to realize it actually sounded a bit worse. I’m not sure how I thought swapping in unpowered PC speakers would be an improvement. I also realized that the Cambridge speakers were actually 3.5 Ohm — probably not a big deal but long term maybe not a great idea. In the end I put the factory speakers back in both cabs, annoyed with the whole project. Anyway, these were never meant to sit in someone’s office, but in cacophonous arcades pushed, by the dozens, side-to-side. This was another lesson in being happy with what you already have.

Galaga Restore Part 3

A few items had remained to finish this project, largely the K7000 chassis. I was losing steam after spending weeks sorting out endless monitor problems. Before I could dive back in with another round of prodding, I suddenly found a box in front of our door containing a Sharp Image monitor chassis. Mike! This guy’s too nice — I’m not even sure where he found this thing. Except for a fairly menacing looking very alive spider, the chassis looked to be in excellent shape. I swapped it in and it immediately worked. Using the test pattern generator I calibrated it with a mirror then mounted it back in the cab. While I value the gained experience of working on an old monitor, in the end simply replacing it turned out to be the sanest option.

There were a couple more issues to work out. One was quick, replacing the 35-year-old 6×9 speaker. It actually sounded fine, but if I could eke out a small improvement, why not. Surprisingly I could find very few 6×9 speakers between $10 and $75, so I chose a Lanzar OPTI2698 — 8 Ohm and capable of 1190 more watts than necessary.

Now for the joystick. Even after previously spending several numerous hours rebuilding the original, it continued to feel sloppy. Worse, the two leaf switches would occasionally need bent again to help the stick auto center, inevitably causing the ship to move on its own in one direction (more on that in a minute) when the strength of both leafs weren’t exactly the same. Rather than try finding another Galaga stick, I started to consider Mike’s suggestion of using a Pac-Pro joystick. While I usually loathe the idea of swapping in modern replacements, the originals just didn’t wear well, and this was still a leaf stick. It mounted on the control panel with a Twisted Quarter Galaga adapter plate, with the oval hole in both acting as a 2-way guide. Unfortunately once the control panel was back on the cabinet, I found that it wouldn’t shut completely — the Pac-Pro base and the top leaf tabs were protruding about 1/8th of an inch too far. The tabs were able to bend 90 degrees, but I had to take the Dremel to one side of the new base. Nothing that’s ever seen, and it fit. I wish the red balltop was the same size and material as the original, but its matte finish matches the overlay well. It’s considerably stiffer but hopefully that will become less noticeable as it breaks in.

Overlapping with the previous issue of the old leaf switches sometimes nudging the ship by themselves, at some point this started to happen even when the joystick wasn’t plugged in. After crediting up, the ship would slowly gravitate to the left in random blips. It turned out to be one of the Namco custom chips, 51xx. I swapped it out with another 51xx on a spare Galaga PCB I happened to have. Previously I’d hoped to fix this second board and sell it, but having a donor board on hand seems a much better idea.

It’s great having the game finished, slid in next to Gyruss, and actually playable. I owe a big thanks to Mike for not only locating and delivering Galaga, but also tirelessly answering my tiresome questions, and problem solving from beginning to end. He elevates “a friend in the hobby” into something we should all hope to emulate.

Galaga Restore Part 2

It’s been a few months since Galaga was mostly wrapped up, with one remaining snag that’s lingering on into the new year. What could it be? How exiting, but first let’s see where we left off.

I applied several coats of paint to the front and back of the cabinet, the coin door, other metal parts and screws. For a rattlecan, as it’s affectionately called, Rustoleum Satin Black actually does a decent job on smooth surfaces. At some point I suppose I really should look into an air gun. There was a stubborn bondo hump on both the coin door and the front of the cab from patched holes which took three or four rounds of sanding and painting but eventually blended in. After a few days of drying, I applied the kick plate and front art, bolted the coin door back on and added new coin door inserts and bulbs. The original Midway coin door plate, despite my best efforts to save it and the rivets, had to be replaced by a repro. Next came the control panel overlay and rebuilding the original joystick, which included replacing the bushings and tweaks to the leaf switches to try and get the stick to center with less slack.

At one point I had intended on adding a Galaga ’88 board to the mix, requiring a double jamma adapter, a Galaga-to-JAMMA adapter, and of course Galaga ’88. Eventually I found the PCB, but it wasn’t cheap and looked so good in the Egret that I decided to skip the dual setup and leave Galaga as original.

The last issue to work out was the finicky K4600 monitor. It had a magenta cast to it, was faded to almost black at the top and overly bright at the bottom, and had occasional flickers of light. I started by replacing the caps and reflowing solder on the chassis — no change. Hoping that it may just need the pots fine tuned, I spent hours calibrating it but the issues remained. Still, it was good experience for someone with no real monitor knowledge, including watching my first horizontal width coil disintegrate.

As I started looking on KLOV for local replacements, Mike offered up a K7000 project monitor. Since the closest alternative was in Sacramento, I agreed to Mike’s generous donation and began researching known issues and buying a few parts: flyback, HOT, voltage regulator, C36 safety cap, and R103. Little by little I replaced the parts that had failed, but I still couldn’t get the thing to power up until Mike pointed out that the middle leg on the HOT wasn’t connected. Fool!

While the K7000 was now firing up, the image was rather magenta again, strangely similar to the K4600 — while I could see red, blue and green individually, it somehow wasn’t mixing for pure whites. To rule out the PCB I tried Gaplus which gave exactly the same results. Then came a series of never ending tweaks and tests, checking B+ (123.6), to more reflowing and calibrations. Mike brought over a test pattern generator which helped since Galaga only displays a test grid. We adjusted convergence, then tried swapping Q201, Q202, and Q203 transistors around on the neckboard. Nothing seemed to help, then at some point we lost blue entirely. Since then some good suggestions have come through KLOV, requiring more time on this before I start hunting for another K7000 chassis.

So Galaga — it’s close! The cab was looking good, though like Gyruss I kept the sides original so it certainly looks better slid in next to other games. Thanks to the enhancement pack it’s now saving high scores like Gyruss. Hopefully with a bit more work on the monitor this project will be completed.